7.0 Wake Turbulence

7.01 Avoiding wake turbulence is

(1) the sole responsibility of ATC.

(2) the responsibility of the pilot, only when advised by ATC of the possibility of wake turbulence.

(3) a responsibility shared by both the pilot and ATC.

(4) the sole responsibility of the pilot.

7.02 Hazardous wake turbulence caused by aircraft in still air

(1) dissipates immediately.

(2) dissipates rapidly.

(3) may persist for two minutes or more.

(4) persists indefinitely.

7.03 Which response is most correct with respect to wake turbulence?

(1) Wing tip vortices are carried by the ambient wind.

(2) Wing tip vortices have a circular and downward motion.

(3) Wake turbulence exists behind all aeroplanes and helicopters in flight.

(4) Response (1), (2) and (3) are correct.

7.04 The wing tip vortices generated by a heavy aeroplane can cause a lighter aircraft encountering them to

(1) go out of control.

(2) continue descent even when maximum power is applied.

(3) sustain structural damage.

(4) experience any of the above situations.

7.05 During the two minutes after the passage of a heavy aeroplane in cruising flight, hazardous wing tip vortices will

(1) dissipate completely.

(2) dissipate rapidly.

(3) dissipate very slowly.

(4) remain at cruising altitude.

7.06 The pilot of a light aircraft on final approach close behind a heavier aircraft should plan the approach to land

(1) beyond the touchdown point of the other aircraft.

(2) prior to the touchdown point of the other aircraft.

(3) at the touchdown point of the other aircraft.

(4) to the right or left of the touchdown point of the other aircraft.

7.07 To avoid wake turbulence when taking off behind a large aircraft, the pilot should

(1) remain in ground effect until past the rotation point of the large aircraft.

(2) become airborne in the calm airspace between the vortices.

(3) taxi until past the rotation point of the large aircraft, then take off and remain below its climb path.

(4) become airborne before the rotation point of the large aircraft and stay above its departure path or request a turn to avoid the departure path.

7.08 Wake turbulence is produced by

(1) heavy aeroplanes only, regardless of their speed.

(2) turbo-jet powered aircraft only.

(3) fast moving aeroplanes only, regardless of their weight.

(4) all fixed and rotary wing aircraft.

7.09 Wake turbulence caused by a departing large aeroplane begins

(1) before rotation.

(2) with rotation.

(3) after becoming airborne.

(4) with full power application.

7.10 Wake turbulence caused by a departing aeroplane is most severe immediately

(1) before rotation.

(2) following take-off.

(3) above its flight path.

(4) following full power application.

7.11 Which statement concerning wing tip vortices is false?

(1) Vortices normally settle below and behind the aircraft.

(2) With a light cross-wind, one vortex can remain stationary over the ground for some time.

(3) Lateral movement of vortices, even in a no wind condition, may place a vortex core over a parallel runway.

(4) Vortices are caused directly by "jet wash".

7.12 Wake turbulence will be greatest when generated by an aeroplane which is

(1) heavy, landing configuration and slow speed.

(2) heavy, clean configuration and slow speed.

(3) light, clean configuration and high speed.

(4) heavy, take-off configuration and slow speed.

7.13 A helicopter in forward flight produces hazardous vortices

(1) which rise above the helicopter.

(2) similar to wing tip vortices.

(3) which remains at the same level as the helicopter.

(4) ahead of the helicopter.

7.14 Which statement concerning vortices caused by helicopters is correct?

(1) Helicopter vortices are generally weak and dissipate rapidly.

(2) The size of the helicopter has little bearing on the intensity of the vortices.

(3) Helicopter vortices are less intense than the vortices of an aeroplane of the same weight.

(4) Wind does not influence the movement of vortices generated by a helicopter in hovering flight.

7.15 What effect would a light cross-wind have on the wing tip vortices generated by a large aeroplane that had just taken off? A light cross-wind

(1) could cause one vortex to remain over the runway for some time.

(2) would rapidly dissipate the strength of both vortices.

(3) would rapidly clear the runway of all vortices.

(4) would not affect the lateral movement of the vortices.

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PSTAR Commentary:       Previous   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  Next This page written 8 October 2002 by Robyn Stewart.  Last revised 8 October 2002.

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PSTAR Question Sections

1.0 COLLISION AVOIDANCE

2.0 VISUAL SIGNALS

3.0 COMMUNICATIONS

4.0 AERODROMES

5.0 EQUIPMENT

6.0 PILOT RESPONSIBILITIES

7.0 WAKE TURBULENCE

8.0 AEROMEDICAL

9.0 FLIGHT PLANS AND FLIGHT ITINERARIES

10.0 CLEARANCES AND INSTRUCTIONS

11.0 AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS

12.0 REGULATIONS - GENERAL AIRSPACE

13.0 CONTROLLED AIRSPACE

14.0 AVIATION OCCURRENCES

15.0 PIE CHOICES

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